This Day in Failure: July 25

2010: A 30-inch carbon-steel pipeline operated by Enbridge Energy Partners ruptures near Marshall, Michigan, releasing more than one million gallons of diluted bitumen (or dilbit) into Talmadge Creek and the Kalamazoo River. The spill becomes the most expensive oil pipeline spill since the U.S. government began keeping records in 1969, with Enbridge’s costs exceeding $765 million within two years.

2009: During qualifying for the Hungarian Grand Prix in Budapest, Brazilian Formula One driver Felipe Massa, 28, is hit in the head with a spring that had fallen off the car driven by Rubens Barrichello. Knocked unconscious by the impact to his helmet, Massa drives off the track and slams into a tire barrier at 120 mph. He suffers life-threatening injuries, including a fractured skull and fractured forehead.

2009: John Prendergast, 69, a retired Navy pilot from Sterling, Virginia, steers his single-engine RV-7A experimental plane in front of a Taiwanese Eva Air 747 as the jet approaches New York's Kennedy International Airport (JFK), forcing the 747 to abort its landing. The hopelessly lost Prendergast--en route from Martinsburg, West Virginia to Republic Airport in Farmingdale, New York--flies in circles around JFK before finally peeling away, escorted by a police helicopter.

2008: A Qantas Boeing 747-400 en route from London to Melbourne makes an emergency landing in Manilla after an oxygen tank in the cargo hold explodes, ripping a 7.5' x 9' hole in the fuselage and causing rapid cabin decompression at 29,000 feet. None of the 365 passengers and crew aboard the plane are injured.

1990: Rosanne Barr “sings” the national anthem prior to a major league baseball game and is showered with a chorus of boos.

1956: The Italian ocean liner Andrea Doria and the Swedish ocean liner Stockholm collide in heavy fog, 45 miles south of Nantucket Island. Fifty-one passengers and crew are killed in the collision, which rips a huge hole in the side of the Italian vessel. Miraculously, all 1,660 survivors on the Andrea Doria are rescued before the ship sinks late the next morning.

1832: The first recorded railroad accident in U.S. history occurs when four people are thrown off a car on the Granite Railway near Quincy, Massachusetts. One of the four is killed after plunging over a 34-foot cliff.